Join Our Mailing List!
Join the Mailing List

Sign up to receive exclusive cinema news and special offers.

Thank you for joining the Roxy Cinema mailing list!
There was an error. Please try again.

July 29, 2017

Now Showing

  • 4:00 PM

    Body Heat

    July 29, 2017

    Crime / 1981 / 113 minutes

    An homage to the great noir cinema of the 40s, Lawrence Kasdan’s Body Heat updates the genre for the Reagan era by adding in an extra dosage of coked-up DePalma craziness, kickstarting the “neo noir” film movement. The underappreciated Craig Wasson plays the harried protagonist, a Florida lawyer who is drawn into a steamy affair with a business man’s wife (Kathleen Turner at her sweat-inducing sexiest) that leads, as things tend to do in this type of story, to murder. But the real fun comes when Kasdan – directing for the first time – veers into fever-dream territory, taking the plot into places that even the most seasoned film aficionado won’t see coming, making for one of the most satisfying crime thrillers of the 80s. With Ted Danson, William Hurt, Richard Crenna and Mickey Rourke filling out the stellar supporting cast.

  • 6:00 PM

    Double Indemnity

    July 29, 2017

    Classic / 1944 / 107 minutes

    Ranked among the American Film Institute’s top 100 American films of all time, Billy Wilder’s 1944 Double Indemnity is universally cited as a defining example of the noir genre. Wilder has top shelf author Raymond Chandler to help with the scripting duties, bringing his unerring feel for crime fiction to a tale of an insurance salesman (Fred MacMurray) who is seduced (and who better to do the seducing than the stunning Barbara Stanwyck?) into a murder plot that will yield “double indemnity” – twice the value – on a life insurance policy he helped to draft. A film centered around such unscrupulous characters was quite daring at the time, barely skirting past the restrictive Hays Production Code, and its dramatic black and white “venetian blind” lighting – courtesy of cinematographer John Seitz – would become de rigueur for the genre. With Edward G. Robinson.

  • 8:00 PM

    Body Heat

    July 29, 2017

    Crime / 1981 / 113 minutes

    An homage to the great noir cinema of the 40s, Lawrence Kasdan’s Body Heat updates the genre for the Reagan era by adding in an extra dosage of coked-up DePalma craziness, kickstarting the “neo noir” film movement. The underappreciated Craig Wasson plays the harried protagonist, a Florida lawyer who is drawn into a steamy affair with a business man’s wife (Kathleen Turner at her sweat-inducing sexiest) that leads, as things tend to do in this type of story, to murder. But the real fun comes when Kasdan – directing for the first time – veers into fever-dream territory, taking the plot into places that even the most seasoned film aficionado won’t see coming, making for one of the most satisfying crime thrillers of the 80s. With Ted Danson, William Hurt, Richard Crenna and Mickey Rourke filling out the stellar supporting cast.

  • 10:00 PM

    Double Indemnity

    July 29, 2017

    Classic / 1944 / 107 minutes

    Ranked among the American Film Institute’s top 100 American films of all time, Billy Wilder’s 1944 Double Indemnity is universally cited as a defining example of the noir genre. Wilder has top shelf author Raymond Chandler to help with the scripting duties, bringing his unerring feel for crime fiction to a tale of an insurance salesman (Fred MacMurray) who is seduced (and who better to do the seducing than the stunning Barbara Stanwyck?) into a murder plot that will yield “double indemnity” – twice the value – on a life insurance policy he helped to draft. A film centered around such unscrupulous characters was quite daring at the time, barely skirting past the restrictive Hays Production Code, and its dramatic black and white “venetian blind” lighting – courtesy of cinematographer John Seitz – would become de rigueur for the genre. With Edward G. Robinson.

  • 11:59 PM

    Surf Nazis Must Die

    July 29, 2017

    Action / 1987 / 83 minutes

    In the late 80s Troma pictures ruled the roost when it came to fun, low-budget genre shlock, and Peter George’s Surf Nazis Must Die is a prime example of their gonzo aesthetic. After a major earthquake, a marauding gang of punk rocker Nazi surfers seize control of the Southern California beaches, making for a mash-up of the beach party and post apocalypse genres. But all good exploitation flicks need a revenge plot, represented here by a retired African American woman who hunts down the swastika-emblazoned surfers after they murder her son. With solid direction, arch, comedic performances and a cool synth-driven score by Jon McCallum, Surf Nazis Must Die is a perfect beach movie for those who like their camp low down, dirty and plenty violent. With Gail Neely, Robert Harden and Barry Brenner.

Showtimes on
July 29, 2017